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Native American Rhetorical Traditions

An introduction to Native American historical speeches and contemporary debates.

Photography

PHOTO ESSAYS

Matika Wilbur. Project 562

Matika Wilbur's project is dedicated to photographing, blogging about, and filming over 562 federally recognized tribes in the US to create a repository of imagery and oral histories that accurately portrays contemporary Native Americans.

Photo Credit: Matika Wilbur

Camille Seaman. We Are Still Here.

Ciril Jazbec. “Waiting to Move.” 

The village of Shishmaref, home to a modern Inupiaq community, is located on a small barrier island in the Chukchi Sea in northwestern Alaska and has been inhabited for 400 years. The island, approximately a quarter mile wide and 3 miles in length, is facing evacuation due to erosion, increasingly powerful storms, and the thawing of permafrost.

NATIVE AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY in the MEDIA

 

 

Mida Donnessey at her home in Upper Liard, in Canada's Yukon in July 2015. Photo credit: Kali Spitzer. Image Source

 

 

Six Navajo on horseback, ca. 1904.  Library of Congress/Edward S. Curtis. Image Source

ARTICLES

Margolis, E., & Rowe, J. (2004). Images of assimilation: photographs of Indian schools in Arizona. History of Education, 33(2), 199–230.

This paper examines recently discovered photographs of Arizona Indian schools. A major goal of this study is to suggest ways that photographs can be used as primary source data in historical and social research.

Kemper, K. (2012). Sacred Spaces: Cultural Hybridity and Boundaries for Visual Communication about the Hopi Tribe in Arizona. Visual Communication Quarterly, 19(4), 216–231.

This history and ideological critique of tribal laws and policies about photography and other image taking of religious ceremonies of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona explains how the Hopi exercise sovereignty over visual communication about them.

BOOKS & ALBUMS